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« Managing or leading - which is most important? | Main | What is the difference between management and leadership? »
Tuesday
Jul272010

Can anyone become a great leader?

In business, many people don't recognise a fundamental truth - Great leaders are made, not born. Leadership is a skill you can aquire, develop and grow, and in fact, it is something you must improve if you want to drive the success of your business.

This truth is often ignored because of the way people typically progress through a company. Let me give an example. Sam starts off in a hands-on role. Due to Sam's standout abilities at that level, he is progressed to a management position. It is assumed that as Sam knows everything he needs to know about the hands-on side of the business, he will make a good manager. It is also assumed that he will develop the necessary people and leadership skills required once in his new position.

Now, if you're like me, you're probably thinking that there are too many assumptions in that scenario...

Some people do become fine managers after having progressed from the hands-on role. However, others do not as management was not the skill they were originally trained for. Great hands-on skills do not automatically translate into great management or leadership skills. Many people have been successful managers and leaders without necessarily being an expert at the hands-on level.

In a hands-on role, a person is practicing a skill that they were trained for. Many of these people will have no training in management or leadership, and so they will require further training to work well in the ‘hands-off’ role. Sam, for example, could benefit from developing his management skills by joining a CEO group which focuses on improving leadership and management skills.

Could you benefit from one as well? To find out more about how to improve your leadership and management skills through joining my CEO coaching group, please click the link or get in contact.

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Graham Jenkins | email@grahamjenkins.com | 0403 396 665